To mark the end of the Islamic month of Dhu’l Hijjah, we are delighted to share with you our new short film: “Hajj and the Arts of Pilgrimage“.

We hope you find it enriching.

With best wishes
Professor Nasser D. Khalili
Founder, The Khalili Collections

The Khalili Collections

Dearest Friends,
 
We are delighted to announce that on the 21st February at 8pm, Sky Arts (channel 122) will broadcast a documentary about Prof. Khalili’s journey as a collector. Titled The Art of Collecting, the film will highlight multiple objects from the Eight Khalili Collections as National Treasures.

We hope you enjoy watching it .


With Best wishes,
Professor Nasser D. Khalili
Founder, The Khalili Collections

National Trasures

BEYOND IMAGINATION Treasures of Imperial Japan from the Khalili Collection 19th to early 20th century.

This exhibition took place at the Kremlin Museums Moscow from 5 July – 1 October 2017 in the Exhibition halls of the Assumption Belfry and Patriarch’s Palace

In July 2017 the Moscow Kremlin Museums opened the exhibition presenting Japanese applied and decorative art of the 19th to early 20th century from the Khalili Collection. A variety of world famous Japanese kimono, unsurpassed samples of silk embroidery, porcelain, metal and enamel artworks in all its glory was on display. Most of them were created by craftsmen-official suppliers of the Japanese Imperial court.

About ninety exhibits has bern on show at the exhibition, one third of which are the kimonos of the Edo and Meiji periods, including the ceremonial ones. Created for women and men, young girls, children and even infants, these gorgeous kimonos were made of exclusive handmade silk produced in Japan and highly estimated imported fabrics. They are decorated with inimitable patterns typical for Japanese traditional art only, which are executed in techniques of batik, stencil and freehand painting, as well as finished with silk and metallic threads embroidery.

Unique combination of traditions and innovation characteristic for the Meiji period is clearly shown in works of eminent Japanese enamellists and metalsmiths, which has been also on display. Starting from 1873, Japan presented pieces of this type and level at both national industrial exhibitions in Tokyo and at international exhibitions in Austria, the United States, France, Germany, Great Britain and Belgium. Such masterpieces were also used as diplomatic gifts. High-class items were selected for this purpose, since the Japanese government considered development of cultural and economic ties with other states its priority.

Each piece picked for display at the Moscow Kremlin Museums reflects both its high-class execution specific to this very period, and exquisite refined taste of customers and creators.

Exhibition Catalogue

Exhibition venue & opening night images

BEYOND IMAGINATION Treasures of Imperial Japan from the Khalili Collection 19th to early 20th century 5 July 2017 – 1 October 2017

The Moscow Kremlin Museums opened this exhibition presenting Japanese applied and decorative art of the 19th to early 20th century from The Khalili Collection. A variety of world famous Japanese kimono, unsurpassed samples of silk embroidery, porcelain, metal and enamel artworks in all its glory are on display. Most of them were created by craftsmen-official suppliers of the Japanese Imperial court.

About ninety exhibits on show at the exhibition, one third of which are the kimonos of the Edo and Meiji periods, including the ceremonial ones. Created for women and men, young girls, children and even infants, these gorgeous kimonos were made of exclusive handmade silk produced in Japan and highly estimated imported fabrics. They are decorated with inimitable patterns typical for Japanese traditional art only, which are executed in techniques of batik, stencil and freehand painting, as well as finished with silk and metallic threads embroidery.

Unique combination of traditions and innovation characteristic for the Meiji period is clearly shown in works of eminent Japanese enamellists and metalsmiths, which are also on display. Starting from 1873, Japan presented pieces of this type and level at both national industrial exhibitions in Tokyo and at international exhibitions in Austria, the United States, France, Germany, Great Britain and Belgium. Such masterpieces were also used as diplomatic gifts. High-class items were selected for this purpose, since the Japanese government considered development of cultural and economic ties with other states its priority.

Each piece picked for display at the Moscow Kremlin Museums reflects both its high-class execution specific to this very period, and exquisite refined taste of customers and creators.

SOAS Honorary Fellow Professor Nasser David Khalili PhD, KCSS, KCFO spoke on the preservation of history through art collecting at SOAS University of London on 7 December.

Professor Khalili is a world renowned scholar, collector, benefactor and philanthropist as well as a successful businessman. His collections, which consist of 35,000 items, include the arts of the Islamic World, Japanese art from the Meiji period, Swedish textiles, Spanish damascened metalwork and Enamels; each one being the largest in the world of its kind. There is a large series of publications accompanying these collections.

‘Ocean Explorers: From Sindbad to Marco Polo’ on display from 15 November 2016 to 26 February 2017.

An artistic odyssey has dropped anchor on Parisian shores and we are thrilled to see many pieces from the Khalili Collections amongst the booty. ‘Ocean Explorers: From Sindbad to Marco Polo’ is an immersive maritime adventure taking visitors from the mysterious canals of Venice to the exotic coast of China, exploring the making of masters of the seas and all the treasure in between.

Showcasing over a hundred spectacular objects from Morocco to China, Power and Protection is the first major exhibition to explore the supernatural in the art of the Islamic world.
Within Islamic societies, people of all backgrounds have engaged in fascinating and sometimes controversial practices such as the casting of horoscopes and the interpretation of omens. The objects and works of art in this exhibition – which date from the 12th to the 20th centuries – have been used as sources of guidance and protection in both the private sphere and in dramatic events such as battles and royal births. Amongst the displays are astrological charts, dream-books, talismanic clothing and jewel-encrusted amulets.
This is an unmissable chance to see objects of breathtaking quality and astonishing scale, many of which have never been seen in public.